Ron Johnson Launches Digital Ad Showing Feingold’s “Deficit of Trust” on Federal Spending

Ron Johnson Launches Digital Ad Showing Feingold’s “Deficit of Trust” on Federal Spending

Ad cites 1992, 2016 footage on federal deficit, votes against Balanced Budget Amendment to get Washington under control  

The Ron Johnson campaign today launched a digital ad on Senator Feingold’s “deficit of trust” with Wisconsin voters, using footage of Feingold from both 1992 and 2016 repeatedly discussing his plans to address the federal deficit while voting against solving the problem.

“Like a typical career politician, Senator Feingold is saying one thing and doing another – promising for decades to deal with federal spending, but voting over and over against forcing Washington to change,” campaign spokesman Brian Reisinger said of the ad’s launch. “His failures on federal spending, as well as his hundreds of votes in favor of higher taxes, reveal just how far Senator Feingold will go to put his addiction to big government over good jobs and Wisconsin families.”

The ad, which you can watch here, will run statewide on online and social media platforms. It alternates between footage of Feingold in 1992, the year he was first elected to the U.S. Senate, and now in 2016, showing how he has described the federal deficit as a top priority for fixing the economy. It notes that despite his promises, on at least four occasions Senator Feingold voted against a Balanced Budget Amendment that would have forced his fellow Washington career politicians to rein in federal spending.

Key Facts:

  • In 1992, Feingold said the federal deficit was at “the top” of his agenda. As the ad’s footage shows, he also said it was the “No. 1 priority for fixing the economy” and continues to describe it as a goal now decades later.
  • Congressional records show Senator Feingold voted against a Balanced Budget Amendment four times. He has also voted repeatedly in favor of more federal spending, and in favor of higher taxes on Wisconsinites and other taxpayers more than 270 times.
  • In 1992, Feingold introduced a so-called 82-point plan composed of tax increases, cuts to defense spending, and political gimmicks, to reduce the debt. He recently announced another so-called “Fiscal Fitness” plan, again made up of tax increases, cuts to defense spending, and political gimmicks.